Profound Hip Hop Quote #45: Ready to Camp Lo for that “Luchini”

26 Nov

“This is it (What?!)
Luchini pourin’ from the sky
Lets get rich (What?!)
The cheeky vines
The sugar dimes
Cant quit (What?!)
Now pop the cork and steam the vega
And get lit (What?! What?! What?!)”
 

—“Luchini” by Camp Lo


Camp LoWhile listening to the funky jazz influenced rap song “Luchini” by Camp Lo the other day, I pondered if it could still get hip-hop heads out of their seats rapping along with the chorus today.   If you were into rap music during the mid to late 90s, you should have definitely had Camp Lo in your rotation.  Both Sonny Cheeba (Salahadeen Wilds) and Geechi Suede (Saladine Wallace) possess lyrical finesse and laid back styles which caused me to be an instant follower of their music.  Actually, just this year, they partnered up with Pete Rock to release “80 Blocks from Tiffany’s,” but these brothers will always be known for  the classic song “Luchini.”

What is it that makes “Luchini” so profound?  It’s the vernacular the duo uses as they get heads grooving to their flow.  Almost every line of their rhymes requires some decoding and translating.  People might know the lyrics and be able to rap along, but if you were to ask them for an interpretation, many would draw blanks or make educated guesses and possibly be wrong.  First off, some might not even know what “luchini” is; however, if forced to conjecture, the assumption would be that it is about money since it’s “pourin’ from the sky.”  Also, the following line says, “Let’s get rich” which indicates that “luchini” is some form of riches.  In the hook alone, references are made to “cheeky vines,” “sugar dimes,” “pop the cork,” “steam the vega” and “get lit.” It’s no wonder the main word to follow the lines is “What!”  However, this is what I love about this song; a hip hop dictionary is in order for anyone who is not or was not up on their slang, vernacular or regionalisms during that time.

This song not only has a catchy, “rap along hook” and mellow yet funky beat, it also demonstrates how simple colloquialisms can be lost in translation; nevertheless, the slang terminology is what gives people their own unique way of communicating and definitely one of the key features that made this song stand out from the rest and stand the test of time.

Please feel free to share your thoughts.

~Anonomz aka Tanya H. Franklin

Bonus English Lesson:
To use the word “What” after most of the lines in the hook is an example of a chant or in this instance and “call and response.”  It has a significant contribution to the song and works as a tool to engage the listeners.

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